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Waters of Viterbo (ENG)

Waters of Viterbo (ENG)

The hydromineral and hydrothermal basin of Viterbo is one of the most abundant in Italy. The thermal area of Viterbo develops in a vast territory where there are both the so-called free and / or free areas where you can swim and enjoy the thermal waters in direct contact with nature (Bagnaccio, Piscine Carletti, Bullicame, Masse di San Sisto ), and areas where there are wonderful establishments with attached hotels for those who prefer the comforts of spas). Etruscan period: The thermal waters of the thermal baths of Viterbo were already known and used by the Etruscans who had realized the well-being that can be obtained from these waters. Roman period: Historically, the Romans were the people most fond of terminalism and it is therefore precisely from them that the most rational ideas and architectural form came. Also in the Viterbo area the thermal baths were enlarged by the Romans with so many interventions that today they are found (in what remains of them) in a linear extension of about 10 km. There were three springs most exploited by the Romans: Aquae Passeris, Paliano and Bullicame. The Bullicame is perhaps the best known beyond its characteristics also for the quotation that Dante Alighieri makes of it in the Divine Comedy and for Michelangelo's drawings on the splendid thermal environment. Over time the structure and size of the spas underwent many changes but they remained essential environments. There was the changing room, a room for the hot bath (calidarium), a room for the cold bath (frigidarium) and then a room for the tepid thermal bath (tepidarium) which was usually a central plan and smaller than the other environments. A room for a hot air bath (laconicum). A large pool (natatio) which occupied a rectangular room and a portico dedicated to gymnastics. The Popes at the Terme di Viterbo: The thermal waters of Viterbo were equipped by many Popes, including Boniface VIII and also the therapeutic properties of the springs of Viterbo convinced Pope Nicholas V around 1500 to build a residence to be able to stay in Viterbo and enjoy the extraordinary natural heritage of the thermal baths for treatments and baths. Directed by Gigi Oliviero